Pink Goes with Everything

Pink Goes with Everything

Pink Goes With Everything

Breast Cancer Awareness Shouldn't End in October

You're sitting in traffic and notice the car in front of you is adorned with a pale pink, looped ribbon sticker on its rear bumper. Recognition of the ribbon's significance is instantaneous in your mind. You think, maybe it's the driver who survived, or the ribbon memorializes her mother. It could be a man behind the wheel, whose sister beat it twice. It might even be a dedicated volunteer, who helps raise awareness by donating her time at every race and charity event in her town. Whoever is in front of you is silently telling you their life has been touched by breast cancer. The statistics are startling. One in eight U.S. women will develop invasive breast cancer in her lifetime. In 2013 alone, an estimated 232,340 new cases of invasive breast cancer were expected to be diagnosed in this country. What's more, breast cancer is the second most commonly diagnosed cancer among American women, and the death rates are second only to lung cancer.

Since 1990, when the Susan G. Komen Foundation began distributing pink ribbons, the symbol has become a universal show of support for the millions affected by the disease. Whether worn by a survivor, family member, friend or supporter, the ribbon provides a common beacon of connectivity. It is its own brand, which grew quickly through the early 1990s. Today, the pink ribbon has been adopted by a myriad of organizations, businesses, non-profits, publications and activist groups. Most people are aware of the great work accomplished by the American Cancer Society and the Susan G. Komen Foundation, and it's difficult to miss the plethora of breast cancer-related messaging and events throughout the month of October, National Breast Cancer Awareness Month. But what about the lesser known organizations? What about everything the pink ribbon symbolizes the rest of the year?

Hundreds of groups have gotten creative with unique fundraisers and events, supporting their loved ones and raising awareness for the meaning behind the pink ribbon:

Chicks N Chaps: A Montana-based, women's only rodeo group that conducts rodeo clinics in 10 states year round. These clinics are designed to introduce novices how to rope and ride like rodeo pros. 100 percent of proceeds and sponsorship dollars from Chicks N Chaps rodeo clinics benefit local women fighting breast cancer and Montana's Tough Enough to Wear Pink of Montana. All Find more information at www.chicksnchaps.org.

Climb to Fight Breast Cancer: Individuals and teams around the country join professional expedition leaders in a mountain climb fundraiser. Beginners and experienced climbers set fundraising goals and choose an adventure climb on either Mt. Rainier, Mt. St. Helens, Mt. Olympus, Mt. Hood, Mt. Elbrus, Denali, Mt. Adams, Mt. Baker, Everest Base Camp, Mt. Kilimanjaro or the Volcanos of Mexico. Funds raised benefit breast cancer research and treatment at the Fred Hutchison Cancer Research Center. Learn more at www.getinvolved.fhcrc.org.

Bright Pink: This is a national non-profit, and the only one of its kind that focuses solely on the prevention and early detection of breast and ovarian cancer in young women. The group also provides support and education for high-risk women. Bright Pink's mission is steeped in education and knowledge sharing, founded on the belief that enlightenment and empowerment of women foster proactive health choices. The founder, Lindsay Avner, lost her grandmother and great-grandmother to breast cancer, and saw her own mother fight both breast and ovarian cancer at a young age. Avner underwent genetic testing at 22, which revealed she was a carrier of the genetic mutation of the BRCA1 gene. This meant she was 87 percent more likely to develop breast cancer in her lifetime. At 23, Avner took charge of her health with a double mastectomy at age 23. Through her experience, she realized there were few resources for women seeking information about genetics and family history of breast and ovarian cancers. Begun in 2007, Bright Pink has become one of the fastest-growing non-profits in the country, offering community outreach, advocacy, conferences and workshops throughout the United States. Visit www.brightpink.org to get involved.

These are just a few of the innovative organizations that have made breast cancer awareness and fundraising a year round effort. These trailblazers have taken the meaning behind the pink ribbon and developed engaging, educational programs that go beyond the norm. Peace Frogs salutes this spirit of uniqueness and ambition, adding its own contribution to the cause with the beautiful Celebrate Life line, found here!
Pink Goes With Everything

Breast Cancer Awareness Shouldn't End in October

You're sitting in traffic and notice the car in front of you is adorned with a pale pink, looped ribbon sticker on its rear bumper. Recognition of the ribbon's significance is instantaneous in your mind. You think, maybe it's the driver who survived, or the ribbon memorializes her mother. It could be a man behind the wheel, whose sister beat it twice. It might even be a dedicated volunteer, who helps raise awareness by donating her time at every race and charity event in her town. Whoever is in front of you is silently telling you their life has been touched by breast cancer. The statistics are startling. One in eight U.S. women will develop invasive breast cancer in her lifetime. In 2013 alone, an estimated 232,340 new cases of invasive breast cancer were expected to be diagnosed in this country. What's more, breast cancer is the second most commonly diagnosed cancer among American women, and the death rates are second only to lung cancer.

Since 1990, when the Susan G. Komen Foundation began distributing pink ribbons, the symbol has become a universal show of support for the millions affected by the disease. Whether worn by a survivor, family member, friend or supporter, the ribbon provides a common beacon of connectivity. It is its own brand, which grew quickly through the early 1990s. Today, the pink ribbon has been adopted by a myriad of organizations, businesses, non-profits, publications and activist groups. Most people are aware of the great work accomplished by the American Cancer Society and the Susan G. Komen Foundation, and it's difficult to miss the plethora of breast cancer-related messaging and events throughout the month of October, National Breast Cancer Awareness Month. But what about the lesser known organizations? What about everything the pink ribbon symbolizes the rest of the year?

Hundreds of groups have gotten creative with unique fundraisers and events, supporting their loved ones and raising awareness for the meaning behind the pink ribbon:

Chicks N Chaps: A Montana-based, women's only rodeo group that conducts rodeo clinics in 10 states year round. These clinics are designed to introduce novices how to rope and ride like rodeo pros. 100 percent of proceeds and sponsorship dollars from Chicks N Chaps rodeo clinics benefit local women fighting breast cancer and Montana's Tough Enough to Wear Pink of Montana. All Find more information at www.chicksnchaps.org.

Climb to Fight Breast Cancer: Individuals and teams around the country join professional expedition leaders in a mountain climb fundraiser. Beginners and experienced climbers set fundraising goals and choose an adventure climb on either Mt. Rainier, Mt. St. Helens, Mt. Olympus, Mt. Hood, Mt. Elbrus, Denali, Mt. Adams, Mt. Baker, Everest Base Camp, Mt. Kilimanjaro or the Volcanos of Mexico. Funds raised benefit breast cancer research and treatment at the Fred Hutchison Cancer Research Center. Learn more at www.getinvolved.fhcrc.org.

Bright Pink: This is a national non-profit, and the only one of its kind that focuses solely on the prevention and early detection of breast and ovarian cancer in young women. The group also provides support and education for high-risk women. Bright Pink's mission is steeped in education and knowledge sharing, founded on the belief that enlightenment and empowerment of women foster proactive health choices. The founder, Lindsay Avner, lost her grandmother and great-grandmother to breast cancer, and saw her own mother fight both breast and ovarian cancer at a young age. Avner underwent genetic testing at 22, which revealed she was a carrier of the genetic mutation of the BRCA1 gene. This meant she was 87 percent more likely to develop breast cancer in her lifetime. At 23, Avner took charge of her health with a double mastectomy at age 23. Through her experience, she realized there were few resources for women seeking information about genetics and family history of breast and ovarian cancers. Begun in 2007, Bright Pink has become one of the fastest-growing non-profits in the country, offering community outreach, advocacy, conferences and workshops throughout the United States. Visit www.brightpink.org to get involved.

These are just a few of the innovative organizations that have made breast cancer awareness and fundraising a year round effort. These trailblazers have taken the meaning behind the pink ribbon and developed engaging, educational programs that go beyond the norm. Peace Frogs salutes this spirit of uniqueness and ambition, adding its own contribution to the cause with the beautiful Celebrate Life line, found here!
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