Tie Dye

Tie Dye

Believe it or not, the American hippie movement of the 1960s did not create the vibrant, colorful t-shirts and clothing that are still mainstays of popular culture today. In fact, tie dying fabric dates back to the sixth century in Africa, India and Japan. The earliest methods were known in India as Bandhani and Shobori. In Bandhani, which lives on as an Indian tradition, tiny dot patterns are produced by tightly winding thread around fabric and dipping it into the dye. Shabori is achieved in much the same way modern tie-dye is done: using either rubber bands or cloth totie sections of fabric before immersing in different dye colors.

Through the mid-1960s, the American hippie movement intensified, as did the Vietnam War. Ensuing economic strains resulted in many American companies suffering financial setbacks. One such business was Rit Dye, which had been around since the early 1900s. Dying hosiery and clothing at home had declined in popularity, and Rit was scrambling for a way to engage a disinterested market. That's where Don Price came in. Price was a former food industry marketing executive, who ignited a brand campaign for Rit and focused on the beatniks and hippie subculture concentrated in New York's trendy Greenwich Village. His idea wasto capitalize on the free-spirited hippie creativity to uncover innovative, artistic uses for dye.

Two retired artists presented Price with the idea of tie dying clothing and other fabrics, which he realized was the fresh idea Rit needed to invigorate its brand. The practice quickly garnered notice from American clothing and accessories designer, Haalston, who was well-known for designing First Lady Jacqueline Kennedy's iconic pillbox hat. He took tie dye and ran with it, introducing the budding trend to musicians, magazines and other designers. Through the late 1960s and early 1970s,tie dyed t-shirts, jeans, skirts, scarves, jackets and even home furnishings like throw blankets and curtains flooded catalog pages and fashion magazines. Eventually the tie dye rage simmered, but regularly resurfaces in fashion cycles.

At Peace Frogs, we consider our tie dyed designs to be timeless, whether the wearer has newly discovered this colorful form of self-expression, or if they've been donning the rainbow hues for decades. Take a look at our 1960s-inspired tie dye designs and commune with the free-thinking, daisy-chaining flower children that made tie dying fun for hippies and squares alike.
Believe it or not, the American hippie movement of the 1960s did not create the vibrant, colorful t-shirts and clothing that are still mainstays of popular culture today. In fact, tie dying fabric dates back to the sixth century in Africa, India and Japan. The earliest methods were known in India as Bandhani and Shobori. In Bandhani, which lives on as an Indian tradition, tiny dot patterns are produced by tightly winding thread around fabric and dipping it into the dye. Shabori is achieved in much the same way modern tie-dye is done: using either rubber bands or cloth totie sections of fabric before immersing in different dye colors.

Through the mid-1960s, the American hippie movement intensified, as did the Vietnam War. Ensuing economic strains resulted in many American companies suffering financial setbacks. One such business was Rit Dye, which had been around since the early 1900s. Dying hosiery and clothing at home had declined in popularity, and Rit was scrambling for a way to engage a disinterested market. That's where Don Price came in. Price was a former food industry marketing executive, who ignited a brand campaign for Rit and focused on the beatniks and hippie subculture concentrated in New York's trendy Greenwich Village. His idea wasto capitalize on the free-spirited hippie creativity to uncover innovative, artistic uses for dye.

Two retired artists presented Price with the idea of tie dying clothing and other fabrics, which he realized was the fresh idea Rit needed to invigorate its brand. The practice quickly garnered notice from American clothing and accessories designer, Haalston, who was well-known for designing First Lady Jacqueline Kennedy's iconic pillbox hat. He took tie dye and ran with it, introducing the budding trend to musicians, magazines and other designers. Through the late 1960s and early 1970s,tie dyed t-shirts, jeans, skirts, scarves, jackets and even home furnishings like throw blankets and curtains flooded catalog pages and fashion magazines. Eventually the tie dye rage simmered, but regularly resurfaces in fashion cycles.

At Peace Frogs, we consider our tie dyed designs to be timeless, whether the wearer has newly discovered this colorful form of self-expression, or if they've been donning the rainbow hues for decades. Take a look at our 1960s-inspired tie dye designs and commune with the free-thinking, daisy-chaining flower children that made tie dying fun for hippies and squares alike.
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